Posts Tagged 'facebook'

What is Hip? Tell Me Tell Me if You Think You Know

CharlesMingus.MingusAhUmIt’s pretty easy to understand the purpose of the recent viral Facebook poll, “100 Influential Albums” from the perspective of the creator. The quiz has links to buy all of those listed through Amazon, and the data mining of personal information is a goldmine. But  the motivation behind those taking the quiz to me is much more telling.

These sorts of quizzes and polls are becoming increasingly popular on the social networks as the sheer numbers of people willing to share just about anything about themselves publicly becomes a virus of its own. But why are we so drawn to these public displays of hipness?

Many I imagine do so merely out of curiosity. Wanting to know what these records are and whether we may have missed something that we “should have”, thus filling in an empty spot in our own cultural landscape. But one could find countless other lists that could help one accomplish this. Rolling Stone has it’s 500 Best Recordings of All Time, as does NME with theirs, “100 Best Albums Of All Time” How about 100 Best Lists of 100 Best Albums of All Time? Google that, I haven’t the time.

I believe that these polls work because of our need to be hipper than others. In the social world of Facebook, Twitter and Yelp where we share every last sound, bite and image that we experience, the only thing that makes us feel like an individual is doing, hearing seeing or tasting something that no one else (or any of our friends) have. The fact that I may own even 20 out of these 100 should make me feel better, because that’s better than 45% of others who have taken the poll. These numbers matter. To know that having only 1/5th of these recordings puts me above 45% of others? That’s validation. Imagine how good one could feel if they had say 60 or 70 percent of these? So maybe the tendency would be to work the numbers. I mean who “owns” records anymore? Sure I have heard and once owned “Trout Mask Replica“, but with music streaming services like MOG and Spotify amongst others, we can all “own” them all, or more accurately own none of them.

But boasting your personal numbers is not enough reason for many. No, the hipness level continues to rise above your percentile score, when you shout from your social mountain top that the list itself sucks. How on earth can “Clap Your Hands Say Yah” be on this list when there’s no mention of Charles Mingus’s, “Ah Uhm“? No metal bands? C’mon. No Sgt. Peppers? I am hipper than the list itself.

Did I take the quiz? Yes. Did I agree with the list? Some of it. How did I do? Well show me yours and I’ll show you mine. At least I won’t try and sell you something.

Advertisements

Jumo.com: Chris Hughes’s New Direction for Social Media

When I read yesterday of Facebook’s Chris Hughes’s soft launch of his new project, Jumo.com, I immediately clicked, read, and followed. It was exhilarating. I was within the first 200 to follow on Twitter, an early fan on Facebook and, I began combing the web for more information. And I am sure that for him and his partners, it must be reassuring to know that his name has some equity.

With Facebook’s over 400 million users, that’s a pretty good base to start with. The question quickly becomes, how many of them will be attracted to an enterprise whose primary focus is connecting individuals to causes and concerns around the globe, not just connecting old classmates to each other or brands to consumers.

Jumo, is a word from Yoruba meaning, “together in concert”. And with Jumo.com, Hughes hopes to create a place where people can really engage.

As Hughes explained the project, “We’ll be matching people based on their skills and interests with organizations around the world that need their input. It’s a discovery process that first matches, then helps people build relationships, then let’s people share their resources.”

Watching the recent outpouring of money through social media during both recent earthquakes has shown that people are willing to click to pay, or text to pay to show support. What remains to be seen is whether the current social media model can sustain the long term needs of an organization like Jumo, whose goals are so lofty. I for one will not bet against Hughes.

I am curious as to how others feel about Jumo, and what its chances are of succeeding in the long run. Take a moment to check them out at jumo.com, and I would love to hear your comments.

Definitely Not My Last Communion

I spent the entire day today, save for a brief walk in the fresh snow with my dog, in communion. And this blog post is but a continuation of that communion. There are of course different definitions of the word, but my favorite is this: communion as the interchange or sharing of thoughts or emotions; intimate communication.

There are many detractors to social media. There are those that say that we are becoming more disconnected everyday even though through our social channels we are sharing so much, with so many. But if, when we engage those in our communities, we are being thoughtful and honest, how could this be?

Today I read probably 2 dozen blog posts, countless web pages, Facebook links and emails, mostly driven by those juicy 140 character kernels in my Twitter feed. Just about anyone who takes the time to write a blog, or create content of any type, wants to share his/her thoughts and or emotions. The great thing is that these are the people who I have chosen to commune with. A congregation of sorts.

Tomorrow I’ll probably spend the lion’s share of my day continuing to interview with potential employers, following up on emails etc. But for today, it was all about you. Thanks for taking your time to commune with me.

TMI, Too Busy or Just Distraction

With the introduction of Google’s Buzz application this week, I have been thrown for a loop. Not because of the inherent implications of yet another social media channel but more so by the broader effect on the mediums’ consumers as relates to overload.

It’s obvious to anyone who is reading this blog post, that I have not put my thoughts down on this blog in over 8 months. What have I been doing? Well in a word, reading. Reading all sorts of material by others. It’s a very convenient excuse to just explain it away as, “I’m too busy to write”. And at times, this may be true. But might there be just too much information out there? How can we keep up with it?

Just in the realm of the social media world alone there are over 119M blog page results listed on Google. Add to that Twitter feeds, Facebook pages, Linked In updates and whatever news media you regularly check, and it is a daunting enterprise to keep “current”. As I have been “re-branding” myself over the past 10 months, I have found loads of great information, made innumerable new contacts and even landed a few interviews, all with the help of these social media channels. I have learned much about the dos and don’ts of social media interaction. I have seen a very healthy growth in the number of “old school” print people dipping their toes into the future. And I know that for me, there is no turning back.

I love the conversations and the communities that are being formed. I am witnessing an incredible sense of knowledge sharing. And when we share what we are passionate about with those who are interested, everyone benefits. I am going to strive to keep up. Maybe I can cut down the number of blogs I read about blogging. That should give me more time.

Who Has Time for Social Media?

Okay, I get it. Everybody has a Facebook site now. I’ve already heard it said it’s for “old people”. And LinkedIn is for professionals to use for networking. Twitter is pointing people to blogs and websites on every corner of the globe talking about everything imaginable. A lot of this content is extremely good, some, not so much. There are a lot of very good writers, experts in their fields and gurus tapping away at their keyboards filling us with our insatiable need for information. So who has time for social media? Well right now, unfortunately, I do. And it’s still not enough time to keep up.

I have been spending the better part of the last 2 months in my home office, pushing the limits to what my eyes can take, reading, researching, bookmarking (yeah that looks like an article I need to read let me bookmark it for later) and tweeting. And I’ve done this all  in the pursuit of understanding where and what social media is and where it is headed. And what it holds for me.

Are people spending hours at their desks checking their Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn sites? Are they reading their favorite blogs? If so, who’s minding the store? All this content is being pushed around, and I am wondering who is reading it? Well I guess since the unemployment rate is in the 10 percent range, there’s a whole lot of people. Besides me, that is.

When I initially began thinking about this post, the title question was rhetorical. But I guess I really would like to hear some answers. Where do you find time for all this information? Comments?

Not My Post on Politicians Who Tweet

As I continue on my journey through the world of social media / communications, I find myself somewhat overwhelmed by the wealth of information available to me. Great minds offering the latest opinions and tools. or even something that was just uttered at a conference.

I have been planning on putting together a blog post about politicians who tweet (and I will), but have been buried in the morass of research material that I have gathered. Thank you all. But I thought it important to include this post about how difficult it is to research a subject thoroughly enough to feel confident about writing something, while at the same time, keeping up with all the great tweets that lead to great blogs that lead to, well you know.

Just the other day I had a conversation with my 58-year old (sorry sis) sister about my recent forays into social media and what I have learned. I told her that I ended my 30 year run as a subscriber to the LA Times, and how that, yes I miss the way that the news presented itself to me in newsprint. Her fear is that those who seek information solely through the internet, are only going to be exposed to thoughts/opinions that they are already aligned with. My response was that it has always been that way depending on which news source landed on your stoop in the morning. By the way, you would not believe how many phone calls I have received from said LA Times offering me great deals to re-up my subscription. But I am trying to see the way the world presents itself to those who never read a paper.

My kids, both attending the University of California have never been regular newspaper readers like most of their contemporaries. Nor do they buy magazines. And if they choose to watch television, it’s on their terms, either on a DVR or on their computers. So what’s a marketer to do? Listen.

Listen to the fact that that this generation will not accept brands being force fed to them. They want to engage their brands on their terms. And so that means Facebook, MySpace and the internet for their entertainment and information. I do find it interesting that neither my 18-year old nor my 20-year old, bother much with Twitter at this point. They think that their old man is kind of odd. They might be right, but as I told my daughter who is studying communications in college, if you don’t get involved soon, you will miss the boat when it comes to future opportunities.

There’s one thing for sure, I am not going to let this stuff pass me by.


As Bill Tweets

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 517 other followers